Museum of the Civil War exhibit now at Historic 1795 Courthouse Visitor Center, through June 30: George R. Collins, a VMI graduate of the Class of 1911, was instrumental in the founding of the current museum in New Market.

 

John Adamson: Shenandoah Time Machine

Time travel is not really possible, right?  But, if you find yourself in a place that looks and feels 250 years old, let your mind be free and you may feel that you have traveled in time.  That is exactly what happened to me when I visited a recently reconstructed log house at the Luray Valley Museum.  Let me tell you about my time travel experience.

A few weeks ago, Barbara (SCHS President) and I went to visit Rod Graves at Luray Caverns for a reason not part of this story.  Rod is a fellow preservationist, longrifle collector and local historian. He also happens to be Senior Vice President of Luray Caverns, a wonderful place for visitors to the Shenandoah Valley.  In addition to the spectacular cavern, Rod manages other attractions at the cavern site.  To this author, the most spectacular of these is The Luray Valley Museum, an amazing collection of Shenandoah Valley objects which tell vivid stories of the rich history of the Shenandoah Valley.

Rod, with his brother, John (CEO), and the entire Caverns board of directors are passionate about preserving and sharing this vital history and have devoted many years, significant funding and diligent research to creating a truly spectacular collection for the education and enjoyment of visitors.

Among the items preserved at the museum are several very important old buildings. Threatened with destruction and loss at their original sites are examples of 19th century Shenandoah Valley architecture.  Included among these are a log farm house, a historic church, a school and a barn.  This collection of buildings gives the visitor an opportunity to see historic Shenandoah Valley architecture in person.

In 2005 Shenandoah County builder Bill Wine (Historic Restorations, LLC) contracted to remove a small house at the northeast corner of Church and High Streets in Woodstock. Bill estimated that the house to have been built about 1755.

Bill, ever the preservationist, carefully disassembled the house, numbering the logs, stones and boards, hoping there would be some opportunity to reconstruct this historic gem.  Fast forward ten years to when Rod Graves, through his connections in the world of preservation, learned about the old log house. The Woodstock log house provided a unique opportunity to preserve the type of building that served the freedom-seeking earliest settlers to the Shenandoah Valley.

In a functional partnership with Rod, the log building was reconstructed by Bill and his company with the able assistance of local stonemason Clyde Jenkins and family.  Ed Eastman and son built a new roof to original specification and Rod’s own in-house carpenter, Carl Vogleman, did much of the detailed finishing work.

 

Anyone concerned about moving the house from Shenandoah County to Page County should remember that in 1760, there was no Page County, or even Shenandoah County.  We were still part of Frederick County and Woodstock had not yet been chartered.  Everyone with an interest in our early history can be glad that this precious building has been preserved for all to see and enjoy.  Rod expects to open the house to the public in early summer and plans to furnish it with simple, appropriate furniture and fixtures of the earliest period. When you visit the house, be prepared to enter the Shenandoah Valley time machine.

 

Museum of the Civil War exhibit now at Historic 1795 Courthouse Visitor Center, through June 30: George R. Collins, a VMI graduate of the Class of 1911, was instrumental in the founding of the current museum in New Market.

 

John Adamson: Shenandoah Time Machine

Time travel is not really possible, right?  But, if you find yourself in a place that looks and feels 250 years old, let your mind be free and you may feel that you have traveled in time.  That is exactly what happened to me when I visited a recently reconstructed log house at the Luray Valley Museum.  Let me tell you about my time travel experience.

A few weeks ago, Barbara (SCHS President) and I went to visit Rod Graves at Luray Caverns for a reason not part of this story.  Rod is a fellow preservationist, longrifle collector and local historian. He also happens to be Senior Vice President of Luray Caverns, a wonderful place for visitors to the Shenandoah Valley.  In addition to the spectacular cavern, Rod manages other attractions at the cavern site.  To this author, the most spectacular of these is The Luray Valley Museum, an amazing collection of Shenandoah Valley objects which tell vivid stories of the rich history of the Shenandoah Valley.

Rod, with his brother, John (CEO), and the entire Caverns board of directors are passionate about preserving and sharing this vital history and have devoted many years, significant funding and diligent research to creating a truly spectacular collection for the education and enjoyment of visitors.

Among the items preserved at the museum are several very important old buildings. Threatened with destruction and loss at their original sites are examples of 19th century Shenandoah Valley architecture.  Included among these are a log farm house, a historic church, a school and a barn.  This collection of buildings gives the visitor an opportunity to see historic Shenandoah Valley architecture in person.

In 2005 Shenandoah County builder Bill Wine (Historic Restorations, LLC) contracted to remove a small house at the northeast corner of Church and High Streets in Woodstock. Bill estimated that the house to have been built about 1755.

Bill, ever the preservationist, carefully disassembled the house, numbering the logs, stones and boards, hoping there would be some opportunity to reconstruct this historic gem.  Fast forward ten years to when Rod Graves, through his connections in the world of preservation, learned about the old log house. The Woodstock log house provided a unique opportunity to preserve the type of building that served the freedom-seeking earliest settlers to the Shenandoah Valley.

In a functional partnership with Rod, the log building was reconstructed by Bill and his company with the able assistance of local stonemason Clyde Jenkins and family.  Ed Eastman and son built a new roof to original specification and Rod’s own in-house carpenter, Carl Vogleman, did much of the detailed finishing work.

 

Anyone concerned about moving the house from Shenandoah County to Page County should remember that in 1760, there was no Page County, or even Shenandoah County.  We were still part of Frederick County and Woodstock had not yet been chartered.  Everyone with an interest in our early history can be glad that this precious building has been preserved for all to see and enjoy.  Rod expects to open the house to the public in early summer and plans to furnish it with simple, appropriate furniture and fixtures of the earliest period. When you visit the house, be prepared to enter the Shenandoah Valley time machine.

 

Shenandoah County Historical Society Mission Statement

•   Foster a spirit of cooperation between existing organizations, writers, historians, genealogists, collectors, preservationists, and other members of the Shenandoah County community.

•   Aid in the collection and creation of materials and publications about the history of Shenandoah County and ensure that they are preserved and made available to the community.

•   Support efforts by citizens, organizations and government to preserve historic buildings and sites.

•   Share history through programs and exhibits.

Shop for Books and More...

6th Virginia Infantry

Michael A. Cavanaugh

This is a numbered (891) edition of 1000. The story is about the men who served in this regiment, and also inclues an alphabetical listing of the 6th Virginia, including what happened to many of them after the war

Hardcover
Item# 1001

Price: $21
Members: $20

Decision at Toms Brook - George Custer, Thomas Rosser, and the Joy of the Fight

William J. Miller

A must-have book for every Civil War collection. The story of two West Point graduates who find themselves on opposite sides of the Civil War conflict. Their separate paths meet in the Shenandoah Valley. The story is about the conflict between the two men as well as of the Generals they served.

Hardcover
Item# 1027

Price: $31
Members: $30

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Upcoming events...


May 15th from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM: Director's Guided Tour of New Market Battlefield and more in New Market, VA
Explore the battlefield with Civil War historian and Site Director, Lt. Col. Troy D. Marshall who will explain the action as it took place - exactly 153 years ago.  Hear the accounts of the battle in the words of the soldiers who were there.  Tour includes a visit to the Bushong Hone, the movie "Field of Lost Shoes" and the "Bloody Cedars."  Event is limited to 50 participants.  Pre-registration is required.  For info:  866-515-1864 or email: newmarketevent@embarqmail.com

May 20th from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM: Family Fun and History Days in Winchester, VA
There will be a Living History weekend Civil War encampment on the grounds of Jackson's Headquarters at 415 N. Braddock Street in Winchester, VA.  General Jackson and members of his staff will be on hand.  Presentations include Civil War medical tent, camp life, musket firing and troop drilling.  There will be photo ops, personal interaction time, educational and fun events.  Encampment is free and open to the public.  Tours of the headquarters:  $5, less for children and seniors.  For info:  540-662-6550.  Sponsored by the Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society and the National Park Service.

May 20th from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM: Annual Reenactment of the Civil War Battle of New Market in New Market, VA
The reenactment for the 153th Anniversary of the Battle of New Market will be held on the original battlefield property in New Market, VA.  This is one of the oldest continual reenactments in the nation.  Walk in history's footsteps and explore the sights and sounds of the Civil War.  Admission Fee:  $10 for ages 10 and older.  Advance tickets are available by phone.  For info:  866-515-1864

Upcoming events...

May 15th from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM: Director's Guided Tour of New Market Battlefield and more in New Market, VA
Explore the battlefield with Civil War historian and Site Director, Lt. Col. Troy D. Marshall who will explain the action as it took place - exactly 153 years ago.  Hear the accounts of the battle in the words of the soldiers who were there.  Tour includes a visit to the Bushong Hone, the movie "Field of Lost Shoes" and the "Bloody Cedars."  Event is limited to 50 participants.  Pre-registration is required.  For info:  866-515-1864 or email: newmarketevent@embarqmail.com

May 20th from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM: Family Fun and History Days in Winchester, VA
There will be a Living History weekend Civil War encampment on the grounds of Jackson's Headquarters at 415 N. Braddock Street in Winchester, VA.  General Jackson and members of his staff will be on hand.  Presentations include Civil War medical tent, camp life, musket firing and troop drilling.  There will be photo ops, personal interaction time, educational and fun events.  Encampment is free and open to the public.  Tours of the headquarters:  $5, less for children and seniors.  For info:  540-662-6550.  Sponsored by the Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society and the National Park Service.

Shop for Books and More...

    Strasburg, Virginia Our History in Post Cards   •   Gloria Stickley   •   A narrative history of Strasburg, Va. accompanied by an impressive collection ofpost cards - most in color - that start when post cards first became popular. Also maps. 2013. 92 pages. Color.  Hardcover  •   Item #2026  •   Price: $31   Members: $30
  • Images of America: Around New Market   •   James R. Graves & John D. Crim   •   New Market lies at the western base of the Massanutten range. Its crossroads go back to two Native American hunting trails that crossed here throughout the ages. The Town was incorporated in 1796 and the area still shines with its agrarian roots, while over the years it has fostered many educational institutions and maintained historically heavy commerce. The book has lots of photos. 2007. 128 pages.  Softcover  •   Item #2031  •   Price: $23   Members: $22
  • Shenandoah County Trivia (And a little bit more!)   •   Irvin D. Magin   •   1000+ bits and pieces of facts and figures about this Virginia county, its people, its history, and what makes things go. 2002. 138 pages. 4 1/8x 7 3/8.  Softcover  •   Item #2029  •   Price: $8   Members: $9
  • The Story of Strasburg   •   Virginia Hinkins Cadden   •   Originally published in the Bicentennial Edition of the Northern VA Daily newspaper in 1961. Reprinted in 2011 by Strasburg Heritage Association on the Occasion of the 250th Anniversary of the founding of Strasburg. Contains additional articles commemorating250 years. 2011. 65 pages.  Softcover  •   Item #2016  •   Price: $8   Members: $8

More books and other items...

Shop for Books and More...

The Battle of Cedar Creek - Victory from the Jaws of Defeat   •   Jonathan A. Noyalas   •   Last Major battle in the Valley. Sheridan's defeat of Early finally secured the Valley for the Union  Hardcover  •   Item #1016  •   Price: $21   Members: $20
Touring Virginia's & West Virginia's Civil War Sites   •   Clint Johnson   •   This new edition includes new sites, new photographs and updated directions to the significant civil war sites in both Virginia and West Virginia. The 18 tours visit cemeteries, battlefields, historic houses and buildings, monuments and statues, rivers and mountains, sharing the history behind each location. Some stops are surprising. 2011. 280 pages. 2nd edition.  Softcover  •   Item #1011  •   Price: $21   Members: $20

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